Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

Registered UK Charity (No. 115342)

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

British Dyewood Co

From Graces Guide
1956.
1969.

of 19, St. Vincent Place, Glasgow.

of Carntyne Dyewood Mills, Shettleston Road, Glasgow.

1898 Founded as the British Dyewood and Chemical Co.

1911 Company reformed by the United Dyewood Corporation as the British Dyewood Co.

Post-WWI After a period of greatly increased profits arising from the manufacture of khaki during World War I, the company was in renewed difficulties.

1926-9 Connected with Yorkshire Dyeware and Chemical Co Ltd.

During the 1930s there was a shift in production to tannic acid, gallic acid, and pyrogallic acid.

1939 Acquired J. L. Rose

1959 Acquired Lambeth and Co. (Liverpool) Ltd.

1957 The United Dyewood Corporation sold its shareholding to the British firm of Bullough Securities Ltd.[1][2]

1960 British Dyewood came to an agreement with the Harshaw Chemical Co. of Cleveland, USA, to supply tannic acid

1962 Subsidiary of Bullough Securities Ltd. [3]

Acquired by the American Harshaw Chemical company.

By 1980 the company was making heavy losses caused by depressed prices and by difficulties in obtaining China galls, and it ceased trading during that year.


See Also

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Sources of Information

  • Archives of the British chemical industry, 1750-1914: a handlist. By Peter J. T. Morris and Colin A. Russell. Edited by John Graham Smith. 1988.