Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

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Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Nederlandsche Stoomboot Maatschappij

From Graces Guide

of Feyenoord, Netherlands

Ship owners, shipbuilders, and marine engineeers.

1826 "NSM - Nederlandse Stoomboot Maatschappij, Rotterdam" was founded by Gerhard Moritz Roentgen (7 May 1795 - 28 Oct 1852).

In 1828/29, the first compound steam engines with intermediate chambers were built under Roentgen's instructions and management.

1829 Conversion of the British-built engines of the steamers "Herkules" and "James Watt" to compound engine - the first successful application of the compound principle in the world (first successful application for marine engines, presumably?).

The above information is extracted from Albert Gieseler's website.

1870 M. van Ruth wrote to 'Engineering' as follows:
'SIR,- Referring to your article in ENGINEERING, September 9, page 183 (1870), I may mention, as you ask for information on the subject of compound engines of the class described, that precisely similar engines to those you published drawings of were built about the year 1838 at the Feyenoord Engine Works, near Rotterdam, Holland. One of these engines was fitted to the Dutch steamer Admiraal van Kinsbergen, plying between Amsterdam and Kampen, in the Zuyder Zee, and the steamer regularly plied there for something like 25 years. The length of the steamer in question was 116 ft.; width 17 ft., depth 10 ft., and the draught of water 4 1/2 or 5 ft. The diameter of the high-pressure cylinder was 14 in., the low-pressure cylinder 28 in.; stroke of both 36 in.; revolutions per minute 30;· vacuum in condenser 26 in.; steam pressure 75lb. above vacuum per square inch. The cubic contents of the exhaust passages was about three times that of the high-pressure cylinder. These passages were covered with felt and an outer covenng of linen, the cylinders with felt and wood. The consumption of unscreened Newcastle coal was usually 8 cwt. per hour.'[1]

The Etablissement Fijenoord became the Wilton-Fijenoord shipyard.

1895 The shipping company of the NSBM was taken over by Wm. H. Müller & Co and the name of the shipyard changed into the Maatschappij voor Scheeps- en Werktuigbouw Fijenoord.[2]

Note: This was not the same company as the Koninklijke Nederlandse Stoomboot-Maatschappij (KNSM).

See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. [1] Engineering, 2 Dec 1870, p.402
  2. [2] Wikipedia