Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

Registered UK Charity (No. 115342)

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Pedrail

From Graces Guide
1913.

of 3 Wyfold rd. Fulham, London S.W.6

1913-1917 For a list of the models and prices of Petrol Motor Commercial Vehicles see the 1917 Red Book

The pedrail wheel is a type of wheel developed in the early 20th century for all-terrain locomotion. They consist of a series of "feet" (pedes in Latin) connected to pivots on a wheel. As the wheel turns, the feet come into contact with the ground, and rotate so they remain flat to the ground as the wheel moves over them. Pedrail wheels may be simple systems with the feet connected to a rigid wheel, but more complex systems including various built-in suspension systems were designed to improve performance on uneven ground. The system was used in agricultural machinery.

The pedrail wheel was invented in 1903 by the Londoner Bramah Joseph Diplock. It consists in the adjunction of feet (Latin radical "ped") to the rail of a wheel, in order to improve traction and facilitate movement in uneven or muddy terrain. Sophisticated pedrail wheels were designed, with individual suspension for each foot, which would facilitate the contact with uneven terrain.

1902 Detailed report.[1]

1904 Latest developments. Detailed.[2]

1908 September. Details and illustrations.[3]


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