Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

Registered UK Charity (No. 115342)

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Shipton and Co

From Graces Guide
1852.

of Trafford Street, and later Gorton/Openshaw, Manchester

See Simpson and Shipton and Shipton and Simpson

1850 Advert (1): 'SHIPTON AND CO.
MILLWRIGHTS, ENGINEERS,
And Manufacturers of Simpson and Skipton's Patent Reciprocating High Pressure or Condensing Engines.
SHIPTON and COMPANY request the attention of parties requiring Steam Power to their improved RECIPROCATING ENGINE, which they confidently recommend for economy and simplicity. It is constructed on such principles that heavy foundations are dispensed with, and can be placed in almost any situation. A twenty horse engine occupies only a space of three feet six inches square, four feet six inches high.
Works, Trafford street, Knott Mill, Manchester.'[1]

1850 Advert (2): SHIPTON & COMPANY, ENGINEERS, MILLWRIGHTS, &c., AND MANUFACTURERS OF SIMPSON AND SHIPTON'S PATENT. SHIPTON & CO. request the attention of parties requiring Steam Power, to their IMPROVED RECIPROCATING STEAM ENGINE, which they confidently recommend for economy and simplicity; it is constructed on such principles Heavy foundations are dispensed with, and can be placed in almost any situation, requiring very small space. May be seen working daily at their works, where this as well as general business is transacted. Trafford-street, Knott Mill. Manchester.'[2]

1854 Advert: 'SHIPTON AND COMPANY,
Millwrights, Engineers, and Manufacturers of Simpson and Shipton’s Reciprocating Steam Engines.
SHIPTON AND COMPANY having removed to more convenient Premises at GORTON, near Manchester, solicit the attention of parties requiring Steam Power to their Engines, which combine simplicity with economy and cheapness. One of twenty horses’ power may seen at the Old Factory Saw Mills, Union Mill street; or one of thirty horses' power at Mr. Benjamin Parkes's, of Coseley.
SHAFTING and other ENGINE WORK in its various branches.'[3]

1854 'Fatal Accident at Openshaw. — On Saturday afternoon an accident occurred at Messrs. Shipton and Co.'s engineering works, by which a man named Joseph Stanfield lost his life. Some parties were expected to inspect a pair of engines on the reciprocating principle, and deceased was ordered to connect a steam pipe with the one which drives the works' engine, and this he was to do after the engine had stopped at one o'clock. He obtained a small light ladder, which did not reach two inches above the steam pipe, at a height of eight feet, and against which it rested, and he packed up one side to make it level, the floor being uneven in consequence of the bed-plate of the engine extending some distance. The boiler being rather low of water, he started the works' engine to pump it, still going on with the fitting up of the connecting pipe. Whilst so employed the ladder slipped and he was precipitated into the crank pit, where the crank and connecting-rod cotters caught him about the knee, and kept drawing him in and cutting him until it reached his thigh, which it destroyed. He was extricated as soon as possible, but expired in two hours and a half, in great agony. He has left a wife and four children.'[4]

1855 Advert: 'SIMPSON & BARNES (late Shipton and Co.) Engineers, Millwrights, Ironfounders. &c. works Grey-street, near the Railway Station, Openshaw, Manchester, beg respectfully to inform their Friends and the Public that they intend to carry on the above business in all its breaches, and trust, by assiduity and prompt attention, to obtain at share of their support.'[5]

See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. Wolverhampton Chronicle and Staffordshire Advertiser - Wednesday 30 October 1850
  2. Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser, 9 November 1850
  3. Wolverhampton Chronicle and Staffordshire Advertiser - Wednesday 22 March 1854
  4. Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser - Saturday 22 April 1854
  5. Manchester Times - Saturday 6 January 1855