Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

Registered UK Charity (No. 115342)

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Somerset and Dorset Joint Railway: Locomotives

From Graces Guide
1914.
1915.
1926. 8-Couple Goods Engine - Stephenson.
May 1929.
1964.

Note: This is a sub-section of the Somerset and Dorset Joint Railway

A write up and general arrangement of the 1914 built engines can be found in the edition of: The Engineer 1914/04/24


7F 2-8-0 Engine.[1]

While joint owned, the matter of locomotive policy on the S&DJR was left entirely to the Midland Railway. It became apparent that there was need for a powerful goods locomotive to cope with the line's steep gradients. Up until this point the Midland railway imposed a ‘small locomotive policy’ meaning in many cases trains were double headed to cope with demand, but this was deemed unacceptable for the S&D. Therefore, James Clayton who at the time working at Derby, was given free rein to design a large 2-8-0 locomotive that would satisfy these needs.

The result appeared in march of 1914, as the S&DJR 7F. It utilised the same boiler as was on the rebuilt Midland Compound locomotives. 6 were constructed by the Midland Railway in 1914, with a further 5 constructed by Robert Stephenson and Co in 1925, with minor differences in the later batch including a switch to left hand drive and a larger boiler.

The locomotives proved a success, though none were ever built for use outside of the S&DJR. They passed into LMS hands at grouping and all survived into BR ownership, the first being withdrawn in 1959, after a 45-year lifespan. 2 are currently in preservation, one with the Somerset and Dorset Railway Trust, and the other based at the North Norfolk Railway.



See Also

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Sources of Information

  1. 20200711-RM