Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

Registered UK Charity (No. 115342)

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Andrew James Guthrie

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Andrew James (Jimmie) Guthrie (23 May 1897 – 8 August 1937) was a Scottish motorcycle racer, of A. and J. Guthrie, Hawick, Scotland.

1897 Born in Hawick.

Educated at Hawick High School.

Career: joined Army (in 1914) after serving apprenticeship.

Joined brother, Archibald, in business as motor engineers.

A motor-cycle garage proprietor and professional motor-cycle racer, Jimmie Guthrie was known as the “Flying Scotsman,” with a hard-charging motor-cycle racing style, winning 14 European Continental Grand Prix in a three year period 1934–1937 out of a total of 19 European Grand Prix victories.

While racing with the works Norton motor-cycle team, Jimmie Guthrie won the 500cc FICM 500cc European motor-cycle championship for three consecutive years 1934–1937 and the 350cc category in 1937. During the 1930s, Jimmie Guthrie won the North West 200 race on three occasions and a further six wins at the Isle of Man TT races.

While leading on the last lap of the 1937 German Grand Prix, Jimmie Guthrie crashed avoiding a collision with another motor-cycle competitor and died later in hospital from the injuries.

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