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British Industrial History

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Difference between revisions of "Joseph Storrs Fry"

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Joseph Storrs Fry (1767–1835) of [[J. S. Fry and Sons]]
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Joseph Storrs Fry (1769–1835) of [[J. S. Fry and Sons]]
  
Son of [[Joseph Fry]] and his wife Anna
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1769 Born son of [[Joseph Fry]] and his wife Anna
  
In 1795, he assumed control of his parents' chocolate business, then known as Anna Fry & Sons. He patented a method of grinding cocoa beans using a Watt steam engine resulting in factory techniques being introduced into the cocoa business, building a plant in Union Street, Bristol.
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1795 he assumed control of his parents' chocolate business, then known as '''Anna Fry & Sons'''. He patented a method of grinding cocoa beans using a Watt steam engine resulting in factory techniques being introduced into the cocoa business, building a plant in Union Street, Bristol.
  
He moved to Grove House (now Riverwood House), Frenchay in 1800. I
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He moved to Grove House (now Riverwood House), Frenchay in 1800.  
  
1803, his mother, Anna Fry, died and Joseph Storrs Fry partnered with a Dr Hunt and renamed the business Fry & Hunt.
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1803 His mother, Anna Fry, died and Joseph Storrs Fry partnered with a Dr Hunt and renamed the business '''Fry & Hunt'''.
  
Dr Hunt retired in 1822 and Joseph Storrs Fry took his sons on as partners renaming the firm J. S. Fry & Sons under which name it became the largest commercial producer of chocolate in Britain. The three sons were -
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1822 Dr Hunt retired and Joseph Storrs Fry took his sons on as partners renaming the firm [[J. S. Fry and Sons]] under which name it became the largest commercial producer of chocolate in Britain. The three sons were -
* [[Joseph Fry (1795-1879)]],
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* [[Joseph Fry (1795-1879)]]  
* Francis Fry (1803-1886) and
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* Francis Fry (1803-1886)  
 
* Richard Fry (1807-1878)  
 
* Richard Fry (1807-1878)  
He died in 1835 and his sons took full control of the firm, ultimately passing to his grandson [[Joseph Storrs Fry (1826-1913)|Joseph Storrs Fry II (1826-1913)]].  
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1835 Joseph Storrs Fry died; his sons took full control of the firm, ultimately passing to his grandson [[Joseph Storrs Fry (1826-1913)|Joseph Storrs Fry II (1826-1913)]].  
  
 
He was buried behind the Frenchay Quaker Meeting House along with his wife and daughter Priscilla.
 
He was buried behind the Frenchay Quaker Meeting House along with his wife and daughter Priscilla.

Latest revision as of 13:24, 23 August 2016

Joseph Storrs Fry (1769–1835) of J. S. Fry and Sons

1769 Born son of Joseph Fry and his wife Anna

1795 he assumed control of his parents' chocolate business, then known as Anna Fry & Sons. He patented a method of grinding cocoa beans using a Watt steam engine resulting in factory techniques being introduced into the cocoa business, building a plant in Union Street, Bristol.

He moved to Grove House (now Riverwood House), Frenchay in 1800.

1803 His mother, Anna Fry, died and Joseph Storrs Fry partnered with a Dr Hunt and renamed the business Fry & Hunt.

1822 Dr Hunt retired and Joseph Storrs Fry took his sons on as partners renaming the firm J. S. Fry and Sons under which name it became the largest commercial producer of chocolate in Britain. The three sons were -

1835 Joseph Storrs Fry died; his sons took full control of the firm, ultimately passing to his grandson Joseph Storrs Fry II (1826-1913).

He was buried behind the Frenchay Quaker Meeting House along with his wife and daughter Priscilla.


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