Grace's Guide To British Industrial History

Registered UK Charity (No. 115342)

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Grace's Guide is the leading source of historical information on industry and manufacturing in Britain. This web publication contains 147,919 pages of information and 233,587 images on early companies, their products and the people who designed and built them.

Difference between revisions of "William Kinninmond Burton"

From Graces Guide
(Created page with "William Kinninmond Burton (1856-1899) ---- '''1900 Obituary <ref> Institution of Civil Engineers Minutes of the Proceedings </ref> ---- == See Also == <what-links-here/>...")
 
 
Line 1: Line 1:
William Kinninmond Burton (1856-1899)
Professor William Kinninmond Burton (1856-1899)


----
----
'''1900 Obituary <ref> [[Institution of Civil Engineers]] Minutes of the Proceedings </ref>
'''1900 Obituary <ref> [[1900 Institution of Civil Engineers: Obituaries]] </ref>


WILLIAM KlNNINMOND RURTON, eldest son of John Hill
Burton, D.C.L. (Oxon.), was born at Edinburgh in May, 1856.


He was educated at the Edinburgh Collegiate School, and in 1873
was apprenticed for five years to [[Brown Brothers and Co|Messrs. Brown Brothers]], hydraulic
and mechanical engineers, of the Rosebank Ironworks in that city.
During 1878 and 1879 he was chief draughtsman to that firm, and
in the latter year he entered into partnership with his uncle, the
late [[Cosmo Innes|Mr. Cosmo Innes]], in London.
Two years later he became
Resident Engineer to the Sanitary Protection Association, of which
Mr. Innes was Secretary.
In 1887 Mr. Burton was appointed Professor of Sanitary
Engineering and Lecturer on Rivers, Docks and Harbours at the
College of Engineering in the Imperial University of Tokio,
Japan; and in the following year he became also Consulting
Engineer on Water and Sewerage Works to the Japanese Home
Department, in which capacity he designed works for many
towns in Japan and Formosa.
Professor Burton died in Tokio
on the 5th August, 1899. He was an original and independent
worker, of great energy and industry. In conjunction
with Professor John Milne, F.R.S., he wrote the well-known
account of the great earthquake in Japan in 1891. He was an
ardent photographer, and after the age of thirty made himself
proficient in the Japanese language.
He was elected an Associate Member of the Institution on the
5th Bay, 1891. In 1893 he contributed to the Proceedings a
Paper on “Regulating the Rate of Filtration through Sand.”  He also published works on “Water Supply of Towns,” “Modern Photography,” and “Optics for Photographers.”
----
----


Line 16: Line 49:
{{DEFAULTSORT:Burton }}
{{DEFAULTSORT:Burton }}
[[Category: Biography]]
[[Category: Biography]]
[[Category: Biography - Academic]]
[[Category: Births 1850-1859]]
[[Category: Deaths 1890-1899]]
[[Category: Institution of Civil Engineers]]

Latest revision as of 04:42, 14 April 2015

Professor William Kinninmond Burton (1856-1899)


1900 Obituary [1]

WILLIAM KlNNINMOND RURTON, eldest son of John Hill Burton, D.C.L. (Oxon.), was born at Edinburgh in May, 1856.

He was educated at the Edinburgh Collegiate School, and in 1873 was apprenticed for five years to Messrs. Brown Brothers, hydraulic and mechanical engineers, of the Rosebank Ironworks in that city.

During 1878 and 1879 he was chief draughtsman to that firm, and in the latter year he entered into partnership with his uncle, the late Mr. Cosmo Innes, in London.

Two years later he became Resident Engineer to the Sanitary Protection Association, of which Mr. Innes was Secretary.

In 1887 Mr. Burton was appointed Professor of Sanitary Engineering and Lecturer on Rivers, Docks and Harbours at the College of Engineering in the Imperial University of Tokio, Japan; and in the following year he became also Consulting Engineer on Water and Sewerage Works to the Japanese Home Department, in which capacity he designed works for many towns in Japan and Formosa.

Professor Burton died in Tokio on the 5th August, 1899. He was an original and independent worker, of great energy and industry. In conjunction with Professor John Milne, F.R.S., he wrote the well-known account of the great earthquake in Japan in 1891. He was an ardent photographer, and after the age of thirty made himself proficient in the Japanese language.

He was elected an Associate Member of the Institution on the 5th Bay, 1891. In 1893 he contributed to the Proceedings a Paper on “Regulating the Rate of Filtration through Sand.” He also published works on “Water Supply of Towns,” “Modern Photography,” and “Optics for Photographers.”



See Also

Loading...

Sources of Information